• Notes

     Worksheets

     
     
    Please watch the "Dogs teaching Chemistry-Chemical Bonding" video through the link below:
     
     
     
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    Chemical Bonding and Lewis Dot Diagram Tutorials
     
    Tutorial for Drawing  Ionic Lewis Structures:
    http://www.kentchemistry.com/links/bonding/IonicLewisDots.htm

    Tutorial for Drawing Covalent Lewis Structures:
    http://www.kentchemistry.com/links/bonding/covalentlewisdot.htm 
     
     YOU CAN STOP AT SLIDE 25 in the tutorial.

    Below are the questions to answer...they are also attached in a pdf document below.

    • What do you observe when you move two hydrogen atoms closer together?  What happens to the movement of electrons when the atoms are close together?  Farther apart?
    • Why do you think nonmetals tend to be good at sharing electrons?
    • Can metals enter into covalent bonds?  Why or why not?
    • What determines the bond length of a covalent bond?
    • Can one win the "tug of war" during a covalent bond? What might happen one atom did win the “tug of war”?
    • How can a piece of wood floating on water illustrate the condition of lowest potential energy and maximum stability?
    • Rank single, double and triple bonds in order of increasing strength.  How many electrons are shared in each of the bonds?
    Questions for Covalent Bonding Tutorial

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    Old Materials
     
     NOTES
     
     
    Worksheets
     
     Please watch the "Dogs teaching Chemistry-Chemical Bonding" video through the link below:
    Ionic and Covalent WS Review Assigned as HW on 3/8/19
     
     
    Ionic LDD WS 1 Answer Key Assigned as HW on 3/13/18
     
     
    Covalent Lewis Structures HW 1 and Key Assigned as HW on 3/14/19
     
    Covalent Lewis Structures CW 1 and Key Assigned as CW/HW on 3/15/19
     
     
    Polarity of Molecules LDD WS and Key Assigned as CW on 3/20/19
     
     
     
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    Extra Bonding Review Questions and Keys
     
     
     
     
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    OLD MATERIALS

     
    R Chem Bonding Organizer Answer Key Assigned as HW on 3/15/18
     
     
     
     
     
    Polarity Worksheet Answer Key  CW and HW on 3/16/16
     
     
     
    Bonding Regents Review Packet  Distributed on 3/18/16
     
     
    Review Book Assignment Answer Key 3/8/16- Use for Bonding Quiz Review
    Chapter 6: Chemical Bonding questions
    Page 99: #1-5
    1) 2. Lower energy results in a more stable system.
    2) 1. Stored energy is potential energy.
    3) 2. When bonds are formed energy is released and products are more stable. (NaCl) was formed from bonding Na and Cl2
    4) 1. Energy is released when bonds are formed. H + H has more energy than H2
    5) 3. (B.A.R.F.) Breaking Absorbs energy, Release energy Formed.
    Page 103: #10-12
    10) 3. Metals e- become mobile to move freely around the positive metal ions. Metals lose electrons due to their low ionization energies.
    11) 2. Metal e- are mobile and move freely among metal ions.
    12) 1. Properties of metals are good conductivity and luster. Mercury is the only liquid metal at STP.
    Page 110: #26-37
    26) 2. Ca forms a +2 ion by losing 2 valence e-, so it's configuration changes from 2-8-8-2 to 2-8-8, the same e- configuration as Argon.
    27) 3. The electronegativity difference is the least between the atoms of H and I, making it the least ionic in character.
    28) 1. The electronegativity difference between H and F is the greatest, making it the most ionic in character.
    29) 1. The bond between C and O is a covalent bond between two nonmetal atoms. The E.N. difference is (3.4-2.6=0.8) which is less than 1.7, also proving it to be a covalent bond. All other bonds are ionic between metals and nonmetals.
    30) 2. Oxygen has the greatest electronegativity value and therefore will have the greatest attraction for electrons when bonded with hydrogen.
    31) 1. The electronegativity difference is the greatest between K and Cl, making it the most ionic in character.
    32) 4. NaOH contains an ionic bond between Na+ and OH- while the bond within the polyatomic ion, OH- between the oxygen and hydrogen is covalent.
    33) 3. An ionic bond forms between a metal and nonmetal atom.
    34) 4. An ionic bond is between a metal and nonmetal atom and the coefficients of an empirical formula cannot be simplified any further.
    35) 4. All ionic bonds form when a metal loses its electrons to the nonmetal, giving both atoms an electron configuration the same as a noble gas. (Group 18)
    36) 4. O-2 has an e- configuration of 2-8 by gaining 2 electrons to its atoms e- configuration of 2-6. The e- configuration of Neon is 2-8.
    37) 3. Ca+2 forms it's ion by losing 2 electrons from it's atoms e- configuration of 2-8-8-2.
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    Review Book Assignment Answer Key 3/23/15
    Chapter 6: Chemical Bonding questions on pages 98-110, chapter review questions #1-37
    1) 2. Lower energy results in a more stable system.
    2) 1. Stored energy is potential energy.
    3) 2. When bonds are formed energy is released and products are more stable. (NaCl) was formed from bonding Na and Cl2
    4) 1. Energy is released when bonds are formed. H + H has more energy than H2
    5) 3. (B.A.R.F.) Breaking Absorbs energy, Release energy Formed.
    6) 3. 2-8-2. The atom has 2 valence electrons, therefore the diagram should represent two electrons around the symbol.
    7) A) B)
    8) 4.  Chlorine has 7 valence electrons. 2-8-7. The structure should has 7 valence electrons.
    9) A) NH3B)    NH4+
    10) 3. Metals e- become mobile to move freely around the positive metal ions. Metals lose electrons due to their low ionization energies.
    11) 2. Metal e- are mobile and move freely among metal ions.
    12) 1. Properties of metals are good conductivity and luster. Mercury is the only liquid metal at STP.
    13) 3. HCl contains 8 total valence e- to bond. H needs a duet to be stable while Cl needs an octet. The e- shared in the middle form a single bond.
    14) 1. Covalent bonds involve the sharing of electrons between nonmetal atoms.
    15) 1. HCl has the greatest electronegativity difference between the two atoms resulting in the most polar covalent bond. (most unequal e- sharing)
    16) 2. Polar covalent bonds are between two different nonmetal atoms that share e- unequally from different electronegativity values.
    17) 3. N2 shares 6e- between its two atoms to form a triple nonpolar covalent bond. Nonpolar covalent bonds form between two identical nonmetals that share e- equally because they have identical electronegativity values.
    18) 2. Molecules with no symmetry have molecular polarity and are considered to be a polar molecule.
    19) 3. H2O has no symmetry and is therefore a polar molecule.
    20) 2. H only has a duet, or 2 e- to have a full valence shell because it only has the first principle energy level as it's valence shell which can not hold more than 2 electrons.
    21) 1. The bond between H and F is polar covalent because e- are shared unequally due to different electronegativities. The overall molecule has no symmetry causing it to be a polar molecule.
    22) 3. There is no symmetry in HCl making it a polar molecule. NaCl is an ionic compound and is not considered a molecule.
    23) 4.
    24) 3. NH3 is the only molecule with a bond between two different nonmetal atoms with different electronegativities.
    25) 4. Noble gases have 8 valence electrons and the highest ionization energies because they are the most stable. A noble gas does not under any circumstances want to lose any of it's valence electrons.
    26) 2. Ca forms a +2 ion by losing 2 valence e-, so it's configuration changes from 2-8-8-2 to 2-8-8, the same e- configuration as Argon.
    27) 3. The electronegativity difference is the least between the atoms of H and I, making it the least ionic in character.
    28) 1. The electronegativity difference between H and F is the greatest, making it the most ionic in character.
    29) 1. The bond between C and O is a covalent bond between two nonmetal atoms. The E.N. difference is (3.4-2.6=0.8) which is less than 1.7, also proving it to be a covalent bond. All other bonds are ionic between metals and nonmetals.
    30) 2. Oxygen has the greatest electronegativity value and therefore will have the greatest attraction for electrons when bonded with hydrogen.
    31) 1. The electronegativity difference is the greatest between K and Cl, making it the most ionic in character.
    32) 4. NaOH contains an ionic bond between Na+ and OH- while the bond within the polyatomic ion, OH- between the oxygen and hydrogen is covalent.
    33) 3. An ionic bond forms between a metal and nonmetal atom.
    34) 4. An ionic bond is between a metal and nonmetal atom and the coefficients of an empirical formula cannot be simplified any further.
    35) 4. All ionic bonds form when a metal loses its electrons to the nonmetal, giving both atoms an electron configuration the same as a noble gas.
    36) 4. O-2 has an e- configuration of 2-8 by gaining 2 electrons to its atoms e- configuration of 2-6. The e- configuration of Neon is 2-8.
    37) 3. Ca+2 forms it's ion by losing 2 electrons from it's atoms e- configuration of 2-8-8-2.
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