• READING CORNER
  •  Good Readers Ask Questions!

    Good Readers constantly ask questions before, during, and after reading. Questioning provides a purpose for reading and keeps the reader engaged in the text. It propels the reader forward to search for answers to their questions. Questions are answered many different ways: in the text, from prior knowledge, inferences, and further research. There are also some questions that are not answered!
     
     

    Before Reading Questions:
    • I wonder.......?
    • What do I think is going to happen?
    • What am I going to learn?
    • Why did the author choose this title?
    • Why did the author write this?
    • When did the story take place?
    • Who is the story about?
    • Who is telling the story?
    During Reading Questions:
    • What do I think will happen next?
    • How does the character feel?
    • Why did __________ happen?
    • I wonder why __________?
    • What would I do?
    • How is the problem going to be solved?
    • Do you think ____ should have _______?
    • Am I paying attention to the message?
    • Would I be friends with _______?
    • What might happen if __________? What do I still need to find out?
    • Why is this information important?
    • Do I understand what the author is saying?
    After Reading Questions:
    • How did I feel when.....?
    • What was my opinion of.....?
    • When the author said __, I wondered....?
    • Why do you think the author.....?
    • What was the main idea.....?
    • Do I know someone like...?
    • What would have happened if......?
    • Do I agree with what the author said?
    • Would I be friends with _______?
    • What might happen if __________?
    • What do I still need to find out?
    • Why is this information important?
    • Do I understand what the author is saying?


  • WHY READ 20 MINUTES A NIGHT?

    Student A reads 20 minutes five nights of every week. 
    Student B reads only 4 minutes a night...or not at all! 

    Step 1: Multiply minutes a night x 5 each week. 
    Student A reads 20 minutes x 5 times a week = 100 mins. a week. 
    Student B reads 4 minutes x 5 times a week = 20 minutes. 

    Step 2: Multiply minutes a week x 4 weeks each month. 
    Student A reads 400 minutes a month. 
    Student B reads 80 minutes a month. 

    Step 3: Multiply minutes a month x 9 months a school year. 
    Student A reads 3600 minutes a school year. 
    Student B reads 720 minutes a school year. 
     

    Student A practices reading the equivalent of 10 whole school days a year.  Student B gets the equivalent of only 2 whole school days. 

    By the end of 6th grade, if Student A and Student B maintain these same reading habits, Student A will have read the equivalent of 60 whole school days. Student B will have read the equivalent of only 12 days. 
    One would expect the gap of information retained will have widened considerably and so, undoubtedly, will school performance. How do you think Student B will feel about him/herself as a student? 

    Some questions to ponder: 
    Which student would you expect to read better? 
    Which student would you expect to know more? 
    Which student would you expect to write better? 
    Which student would you expect to have the better vocabulary? 
    Which student would you expect to be more successful in school...and in life? 


    Which student are you? 

    Article borrowed from Mrs. Barth, 
    2nd grade teacher, Resurrection School, KY